Photo London 2019 Talks | Thu 16 May

Thu 16 May 2019
Lancaster Rooms
New Wing

The 2019 Talks Programme is guest curated by William A. Ewing, curator and writer, former Director of the Musée de l’Elysée, and former Director of Exhibitions at the International Center of Photography, New York.

MISHKA HENNER, DAVID MAISEL AND JEFFREY MILLSTEIN: EYES IN THE AIR | 10.00 - 11.30
Photographs from the air have become commonplace in a world of planes, helicopters and drones, not to mention satellites. Three photographers renowned for their aerial practice – though each one works at different altitudes, come together to discuss the opportunities – and limitations – of new ways of looking at the world.

MARTIN SHOELLER IN CONVERSATION WITH GERHARD STEIDL | 11.45 - 12.35
Martin Schoeller is one of the world’s preeminent contemporary portrait photographers. He is most known for his extreme-close up portraits, a series in which familiar faces are treated with the same scrutiny as the un-famous. Gerhard Steidl is a publisher, known for publishing international photobooks and contemporary literature. Furthermore, he is active as a curator, conceiving and producing photography exhibitions worldwide.

STEPHEN SHORE IN CONVERSATION WITH DAVID CAMPANY | 13.00 - 14.30
US photographer Stephen Shore is Photo London’s 2019 Master of Photography. Shore will discuss various aspects of his long career and his most recent series Details, which will be shown at the Fair this year. Renowned for his engaging and rigorous writing, exhibitions and public speaking, curator David Campany has worked worldwide with institutions including MoMA New York, Tate, Whitechapel Gallery, Centre Pompidou, Le Bal, and the Stedelijk Museum

LIZ JOHNSON ARTUR IN CONVERSATION WITH HANS ULRICH OBRIST | 14.45 - 15.35
Based in London, Bulgarian photographer Liz Johnson Artur will have her first solo exhibition in the US at the Brooklyn Museum, New York in May 2019 and her first major museum exhibition in the UK in June 2019 at the South London Gallery. Hans Ulrich Obrist is Artistic Director of the Serpentine Galleries, London.

SOPHIE GORDON, HOPE KINGSLEY, FRANCIS HODGSON AND MARTIN BARNES: THE ESSENTIAL FENTON | 16.00 - 17.30
This panel discussion brings together experts on historical photographer Roger Fenton from various institutions and will focus on the public exhibition The Essential Fenton, which is curated by Bob Hershkowitz and on show at the Fair. Special attention will be paid to Fenton’s ‘object photography’, specifically his museum photographs, photographs of objects in the British Museum and his still life photographs.

MARTIN PARR IN CONVERSATION WITH DOMINIC SANDBROOK | 17.40 - 18.30
Martin Parr is one of the best-known documentary photographers of his generation. With over 100 books of his own published, and another 30 edited by Parr, his photographic legacy is already established. Dominic Sandbrook is a historian, broadcaster and columnist and he is renowned for his best-selling series of books on life in post-war Britain. This conversation will examine how British identity is explored in Parr’s work.

JEM SOUTHAM IN CONVERSATION WITH SUSANNA BROWN | 18.40 - 19.30
Jem Southam is one of the UK’s leading photographers and is renowned for his series of colour landscape photographs, beginning in the 1970s and continuing until the present. His trademark is the patient observation of changes at a single location over many months or years. Susanna Brown is Curator of Photographs at the V&A, where she has worked since 2008. Before joining the V&A, Susanna worked in the Photographs Collection at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

MITCH EPSTEIN IN CONVERSATION | 19.40 - 20.30
Mitch Epstein will discuss his latest series Property Rights which was  instigated by his visits to Standing Rock in 2017. The series has evolved to address the quintessentially American question of, “who owns the land and by whose authority?” It looks at the varied stakes in the battles over land usage and eminent domain: access to water; preservation of wilderness and historical sites; the ability to cross our Southern border; access to land for mining. These photographs are an effort to better understand our landscape and why resistance has become a way of life for so many 21st century Americans.